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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
a poll in frons show those in the uk would prefer to leave the eu. we are waiting on the results from italy's latest debt auction. it will be two years of a zero coupon and five years of an italian linked paper. we'll get the results coming up in just a moment. here is a check of the european markets. we have seen them particular to the upside. now with the exception of spain trying to fight back into the green this morning, bolstered basically by the general risk on attitude. perhaps some of the credit flows, some of the equity fund flows boosting stock markets around the world. here is a look at who is leading the index this morning. onte paschi is on the top of the board, up 6.35%. today it's continued to snap back on hopes of.continued investor returnings. asml, elements which help make computer chips is up about 4%. it has been upgraded. it's viewed as a winner here in the mobile phone wars as more continue to shift to that market. sbm offshore, peugeot, tnt express towards top of the pack. at the bottom, it's a different story. down 3.5% o a downgrade, some other companies there
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
of there being a straight referendum on being an in/out referendum, part of the eu, not part of the eu, which is mixed from where most people think they are. >> some of the surveys show the people becoming more worried about it and we saw those comments, what's his face, labor leader over the weekend saying that he's walking out of the eurozone. so clearly, he finds that there's political gain to be made from -- >> and then you saw this british train commerce survey, just 26% of them wanted to keep the status quo, right? >> i thought this was extraordinary. i was surprises how low it is. in this survey, when you ask businesses about how much in favor they are of keeping things the same, only 24%. >> 59% wanted a looser relationship with the eurozone. most people would say, we want to stay part of the eu, but we would like to have far less regulation, far less judgments than just have been contemplated from the european court. >> is britain going to be able to say that where they get rid of the regulation and teen the market and all that? >> that's the number one question. >> and we will explo
. in the au, sovereign debt is what got the -- in the eu, sovereign debt is what got the eu into trouble. the new rules expand to go beyond sovereign debt, beyond mortgage-backed securities. i think there is a real trade- off here. many of these things will not be liquid when push comes to shove. on the other hand, if you have a very narrow set of liquid assets, if those assets get in trouble, as we learned with the euro crisis, then you have something that is a shock that would not be systemic become systemic and threaten the entire system. the only thing that is truly liquid is cash. the vast majority of us banks today -- u.s. banks today and european banks would already be compliant with these rules. i would go as far as to say that bear stearns would have in compliance with these rules, for instance. , what about taking a chance on the lottery? it has paid off for a couple of people in spain. winning ticket holders have seized more than $1 billion in the national lottery. they have been celebrating their luck. the top ticket was around $260,000. new austerity measures mean they will
, says his country will hold a referendum before the end of 2017. that's on whether to stay in the eu. he announced this amid growing calls to leave the european brock, sparked by the ongoing european debt problems. >> i am not a british isolationist, but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just about a deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future for the european union, a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. >> cameron emphasized that britain should not leave the eu. he insists that staying is the country's best interest. >>> romanian police have arrested three men suspected of stealing paintings by picasso, monet and other greats from a dutch museum last year. the missing works have not been recovered. the three suspects are romanian nationals. they are accused of making off with seven paintings from the museum in rotterdam. the works include pieces by pablo picasso, claude monet, matisse and gogan. the combined values is in the tens of millions o
results in europe look set for a change. the eu muniea explains his investigation into the search engine. he's convinced google is profiting by diverting internet traffic for certain businesses. >>> american skres announced better-than-expected earnings for the fourth quarter. it saw revenues of $8.4 had billion. it will make big restructuring changes which includes 5,400 job cuts throughout the quarter. shares dipped in extended hours of trading the. >>> and the fate of superman remains firmly with warner brothers and dc comics after a decision from a california court. the court of appeals said that the rights for the man of appeals should not stay with the cocreators. the decision means that warner can release this summer's new superman reboot without fear of legal challenges. so we're watching today. who is your favorite hee roar? superman, ironman, super mario draghi? whoever you like, e-mail us, tweet us. my produces asked me who i thought my favorite super hero was. it took my a while to think about it, but then i thought hong kong fooey. there you go. many happy memories. talking
that continue to implement austerity measures. the eu statistics office announced unemployment in the zone stood at 11.8%. up 0.1 percentage points since october and highest since the euro was introduced in 1999. within the zone, spain showed the highest rate. it rose from 26.6% in spain. many young people out of work under half of those under 25 were jobless in the month. up 0.7 points since october. in portugal, unemployment stood at 16.3%. 14.6% in ireland. for greece, latest data up only to september. the jobless rate in that month, 26%. 0.7 percentage points higher than in august. >>> smoke from electry call fire filled the cabin of a boeing 787 at a boston airport. it was preparing for its next flight no. one was injured. a mechanic spotted smoke rising from the back of the aircraft at logan international airport. the plane had flown in from japan. all 172 passengers and 11 crew members had disembarked. firefighters found flames coming from a battery pack under the passenger's compartment and put out the fire. the battery starts the auxiliary power unit. it supplies electricity while the a
of the eu poverty categories. india has officially made a protest to pakistan after two soldiers were killed in kashmir. the army says pakistani troops calls -- crossed a line of control, entering indian territory and poppa stein denied the accusation as propaganda -- pakistan deny the accusations as propaganda. >> in southeastern australia, firefighters are battling nearly 200 bushfires as hundreds of people have been forced to leave their homes. one family who escaped the blaze that destroyed their home by hiding under a jetty, and they watched as several of their neighbors' houses burned down. the town in tasmania is one of the worst affected by the fires. andrew thomas has more. >> firefighters are racing to and through the latest blaze before it could get out of control. more than 150 wildfires raged in a study overnight and into wednesday morning. given the extent of the fires, in the worst conditions australia has had in many years, damage to buildings was remarkably light. this historic house in the southern state of victoria was the exception rather than the roll. although daylight
can be taken out of his position. >> we are seeing a lot of military maneuvers by the u.s. and e.u. in terms of moving arsenals to the turkish border region of syria. >> maybe these are the anti- missile defenses. i am not aware of a large contingency of people moving their to suggest there is an idea of intervention. it does not seem like intervention is on the radar. >> we will leave it there. thank you for joining us. pakistan says indian troops have killed a soldier in the disputed region. two sides exchanged fire across the line of control that is an internationally recognized border. india is accusing them of violating the cease-fire. the u.s. drone strike killed 16 people in northern pakistan. it comes days after another drought attack killed a top rebel leader in the area. pakistani intelligence officers say. taliban hideouts were targeted on sunday. >> according to reports, u.s. drone strikes on at least three different targets in the tribal territory leaves at least 16 people killed on the ground after 10 missiles were fired by the drones operating over the territory. in
, the eu debt crisis and superstorm sandy are expected to top issues. take a look at shares this morning. before the report, they're down .75% in frankfurt. so trailing the 34k9. they have been roughly flat over the last few months. james is a huge fan of werings season. you're so excited about this one, i know. >> i live for the wering hes season. you could spend almost your entire time -- >> there's only about three months of the year when you're not engaged in looking at earnings. >> ask you're probably on holiday. >> and are we too focused on werings season? >> samsung, earnings results up, share price down. if you think earnings is relative for share price performance, it isn't. we're talking about the reporting season rather than the underlying earnings. >> they have quite a lot of leeway. they've given guidance to the analysts about what those earnings might look like in the near term. all the analysts are pawing at the results. all in all, a huge amount of activity and brain power wasted on something which in the near term has been well flagged, isn't that important. >> at the sa
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over a period of time. when they do happen, they have to look at have they been in line with all their expectations? >> and what's happening with capacity? it's dictated by capacity levels. >> yeah. pnc, capital comes in and out frequently been we are seeing money coming into the insurance sector. as capacity comes in, rates will go down. >> i want to talk about life, but first to cap off what happened with superstorm sandy, it took a while to get a sense of how costly that event was. what's emerging? >> i think most
, the eu are still our enemy. you should sign the paper you never leave sudan, never travel out of sudan, and never [indiscernible] and i did not. >> he refused? >> i refused to sign it. >> we still on the hunger strike? >> yes. >> they put in a feeding tube for you? >> [indiscernible] after i arrived in the sudan hospital. >> the ticket onto an airplane at guantanamo? they put you on a plane on guantanamo? >> yes. me and to the people from sudan -- two people from sudan. >> did they put back on your head? >> people from afghanistan. they took us from guantanamo and landing in baghdad, iraq. then they changed the aircraft and set me to sudan. we had another guy from morocco to sudan. >> when you landed in khartoum, was your family there? >> my family at that time was in doha, but they came to me. when i came to sudan, because i sat too long, but did not understand where i was. i did not feel anything. i opened my eyes and i find myself in the hospital in sudan. after five or six years, my wife and my son. >> did you recognize your son? >> of course. of course. by feeling, not by his face
. in the u.k., this big e.u. debate about how important is european trade in the future, as well. you've also been speaking to the prime minister of latvia. what does he have to say? >> reporter:. latvia is a poster child, isn't it, for those on the right economically if you like who think that austerity and paying dunn your debts is the way that you restore growth. latvia had a very difficult crisis. they had negative growth and a contraction of the economy of somewhere around 20%. last year, they grew 5%. this year they're expected to grow 3.5%. and that's because they front loaded a lot of the cuts in government spending, and they forced down wage rates. i caught up with the latvian prime minister earlier this morning on "squawk box" and said, well, you've done it, greece, spain, italy, portugal, perhaps they should be learning lessons from you. let's listen to how he responded. >> i wouldn't go as far as now to tell exactly other countries what should be -- what they should be doing because each country has its own difficulties and its own way out of the crisis. but in general, we see tha
. i want you to react. start with number 10, that eu structural problems we main unresolved. when i first heard that, i don't think they will be unresolved. you're right, the market has bid things it's looking like the world is better. >> last year, all the european markets were up and europe was in a semi-recession and all the european markets were up semi-20% and i have them down this year in reaction. >> what about the euro? >> euro is relative to the dollar. ecb expanding the money supply and fedex spanding money supply. it's a race to the bottom. i don't know who will win it but i don't think there will be much change to the euro. >> i don't think euro ever resolves this issue, does enough to put them off when under pressure. >> sounds familiar. >> that's the environment we're in. i do think the markets are signaling core europe and stock growing again this year, growing uf to keep the eurozone out of its recession. if that doesn't happen, markets will go down. >> the surprise component of that is the 10% decline in the various european indexes. that's what people aren't prepar
saying you're special, but only special if you stay at the heart of the eu. they're under pressure to renegotiation the relationship with brussels. but the u.s. assistant secretary said such a plan would have major consequences. as chairman of the business in europe outlined on cnbc last night. >> we don't want to run the risk of trying to set the bar too high in the sense that there's some fantastic renegotiation we can have where we can cherry pick the bits we like, get rid of the bits we don't, because the chances of that happening are probably close to zero. so we don't want to see any risk in our membership. we want more reform by absolutely we do. we made that very clear in the letter. but we don't want to risk or membership because our membership is responsible for millions of jobs and underpins our future prosperity. >> so that debate is going to em. at the same time, david, you think the pound is going to come under pressure. it's a triple cocktail that's going to undermine it. what is that? >> yeah. that's the idea we had, we were talking last year about europe rate cuts,
that they then find a solution presented to brussels and basically present the rest of the eurozone or the eu with a -- do you think this criticism is justified? >> certainly this is a point of criticism that's made outside of germany and france but that's made inside germany and france. some politicians frmt call for widening of the partnerships such as poll left-hand looking towards the east or spain or italy. even more so in the french population. there's a call of widening this partnership. as i've said, france and germany often do have contradictory policy positions. so other countries can really find themselves within these positions, i think. so at the end of the day, it's not so much i think a question of content, but rather a question of style. so what germany and france need to make sure is that they do show leadership, as i've said, to their political and economic weight, but they do find the balance between leadership and dominance because surely dominance is not what either of the two countries or any country in europe would want. >> lead but don't -- >> back to you. >> thank you
the thing that differentiates the u.s. from so many of the other countries especially in the eu we know how to fix our problem, and we're just at lagerheads as to which way to go. >> reporter: but the head of the international monetary fund christine lagarde said here "the u.s. has to confront this." if those decisions are postponed again -- >> well it will be pushing the can down the road again which was the reproach that we made against the europeans and i don't think that the u.s. should fall in that trap. >> reporter: and with the u.s. economy now showing renewed strength, the feeling here is that the u.s. could help pull up the rest of the world, if washington could just get out of the way. charlie, norah? >> anthony mason thank you. >>> in the international press institute reports that 132 journalists were killed around the world last year and reporting on the war in syria is especially dangerous for westerners. more than two months ago american freelance correspondent james foley was abducted by armed gunmen and hasn't been heard from since. he's a friend of o
growth. recovery under the spotlight. it takes on the rotating presidency of the e.u. steve spoke to the country's deputy prime minister and asked about dublin's plans to exit the e.u./imf support program and the chances of ireland brokering a budget deal during its pregnancy. >> it was disappointing the agreement wasn't reached in november. the president is proceeding with having discussions with member states. we expect that in and around february or certainly the early part of the year that there may be new proposals for a european budget for the next seven years. i think it's important that the european union has a budget that is fit for purpose. member states have given the european union a lot of additional competences over the past number of years. and it's important that we have a budget which is capable of delivering on those. and in particular, delivering on the initiatives that the european union needs to take to get the european economy to grow, to create jobs. areas like research, for example, the common agriculture policy. these are areas that need financial support
enlarging the stability in europe itself by enlarging our institution, the eu or nato. what's happened to that agenda? is a no longer a part of the democratic countries? and if the answer is was so care about -- are whether georgia can become more stable, how do we get smarter about it? it isn't obvious our institutions hold the same if you used to hold five or six years ago. it isn't obvious that comes like ukraine had to stay democratizing instinct, the country of central europe had 10 years ago. so what, if anything, would you do different to make sure part of your democratic in state? >> i'd like to say quickly, i think some countries have taken a bit of an appetite suppressant when he came to their ambitions of being part of the european union, for example. >> but they are democratic. >> but they are democratic. but there also has to be benefit that flows. i think that is very much a part of the typos as to whether people are going to pursue being part of a larger union, being part of an obsession like nato. there has to be some apparent benefit in so doing. you know, the ability
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)